Strip Steak

Pre-Salted Beef

We put forth my son’s accidental discovery of the benefits of salted beef left in the refrigerator to settle for 3 days. We were so impressed by the result in our own experiment that we added the step with our butcher. Specifically, we instructed that he salt the steaks immediately after cutting them and before packaging. I picked up one NY Strip in its hard frozen state on my way back to Houston on Friday to test the result. Arriving in Houston at 3 pm., I set the steak on our counter to partially thaw in order to re-start the process of salt osmosis; that is, when it had only a slightly frozen area in the middle of the steak but still cold thawed areas, I then put it into the refrigerator to thaw completely at a 34 degree temperature.

Sunday noon, the test began. After removing the package and leaving the steak on the counter for 30 minutes to bring it to room temperature, I cooked the steak in a medium high iron skillet, the bottom of which was coated lightly in olive oil and butter. In went the NY Strip for 4 minutes while the down side was developing a nice sear; when that happened, I flipped the steak, poured in just a bit of water, covered the skillet with my dutch oven lid, and removed it from the fire. It sat for another 7 minutes and I ate it. Clearly more tender, clearly even more flavor. Total time from the partial thaw on Friday to the skillet on Sunday: 45.5 hours. Had we had it for dinner instead of lunch, it would have added about 6 hours to the process. My guess is it would only get better with the added time.

So let’s review how this can be. I had heard years ago that allowing salt to sit on a steak started a process whereby the salt penetrated the muscle and turned the tendons within into liquid form. That explains the added tenderness. What about added flavor? my guess is this - we know that the tendons are pure protein so they are going to have a protein flavor. But that is not perceived when they are in their hard, tough form. It is only when they liquefy in reaction to the salt that taste and additional juices are released.

Please let us know if you have the same experience with our meats marked with “Himalayan Salt”. You can find me at glenboudreaux85@gmail.com. Thank you all from the Boudreauxs and the entire crew at JVF.  Our very best regards to and gratitude for you. You make it happen for us.
 

Recipe: Steaks

Here’s a good way to cook your steaks (NY Strip, Ribeye, Tenderloin medallions, skirt, flank, hanger) and pork chops (bone-in or out).

How to Cook a Steak

Ingredients:

  • Olive oil and butter
  • Sea salt
  • Crushed black pepper
  • 2-4 garlic cloves, cut in half
  • 1 tbsp minced shallots
  • Parsley
  • 1-2 tbsp unsalted butter
  • Skillet

Directions:

  1. At least an hour before you are to cook your meat, pat it dry, add salt and pepper, and let sit out to bring it up to room temperature.
  2. Cover the bottom of the skillet with oil and heat on the stove at high heat until the pan starts to smoke. Add the steak to the pan, and let sear until you get a nice medium/dark brown crust. Flip the steak, and sear the other side. Turn down the stove to medium heat.
  3. Turn the burner to lowest setting, add the 2 T., parsley, garlic, and shallots to the pan, and cover the skillet. In about 2 minutes, stir the sauce you have made and spoon it over the meat. Remove from burner and leave covered for another 5 minutes.
  4. When you plate the steak, dress it with the au jus, butter, shallots, garlic, and parsley from the pan.

Recipe: The Delmonico, Enhanced

The Delmonico, Enhanced

Ingredients:

  • 1 grass fed New York strip steak (3/4 – 1 lb)
  • Sea salt
  • Crushed black pepper
  • 2-4 garlic cloves, cut in half
  • 1 tbsp minced shallots
  • 3-5 thyme stalks
  • 1-2 tbsp unsalted butter
  • Sautee pan

Directions:

  1. At least an hour before you are to cook your steak, pat it dry, and let sit out to bring it up to room temperature. This will help the steak cook through more evenly, and give it a nice crust.
  2. After the hour has elapsed, dry the steak once again with paper towels. Then, add salt and crushed black pepper to both sides of the steak, to taste.
  3. Heat the pan on the stove at high heat until the pan starts to smoke. Add the steak to the pan, and let sear for 4 minutes, until you get a nice medium/dark brown crust.
  4. Flip the steak, and sear the other side for about 2 minutes. After the 2 minutes have elapsed, turn down the stove to medium heat. After a few seconds, add the butter, thyme, garlic, and shallots to the pan. Once the butter has melted, begin to spoon the butter mixture over the steak for another 2 minutes or so.
  5. Once the steak has your desired tenderness, remove from the pan, and let sit for about 5 minutes.
  6. When you plate the steak, dress it with the remaining butter, shallots, garlic, and thyme from the pan.

Recipe: Delmonico's Steak

The Delmonico Steak House in New York, established in the 1830's with a life of nearly 130 years, was perhaps the most famous steak house in the U.S. I ran across the recipe for their Delmonico steak, which is a bone-in loin strip just like we deliver.

Delmonico's Steak

Season with salt (only) on both sides. Baste with oil or melted butter. Sear on one side in a hot iron skillet, flip and turn the fire off, cover lightly with a sauce of butter, chopped parsley, salt, pepper, and fresh lemon, let rest for 5 minutes. Eat.